Collaboratively built and maintained by the global AI community

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OmdenaLore is developed by the community

We went on a mission to build OmdenaLore, an open-sourced data science package that provides comprehensive and ready-to-use Python classes and functions to solve almost any machine learning problem in an accelerated manner. We want this to be a one-stop-shop…


Photo by Charl Folscher on Unsplash

A global team of changemakers applies AI to develop more inclusive policies during pandemics.

When travel is restricted, schools closed, businesses shut down, and communities put into quarantine, people lose income, employment, and access to healthcare and food.

While enforcing these lockdowns, are Government policies around the world taking into account the poorest and the most vulnerable?

Unintended consequences of the lockdown

#1 Increase in domestic abuse

$In the first three weeks of the lockdown domestic abuse killings in the UK more than doubled [1], Childline India helpline received more than 92,000 SOS calls asking for protection from abuse and violence in 11 day which is an increase by 50%[2], Lebanon and Malaysia, for example, have seen the number of calls to helplines double…


“Some believe that bolstering school security will deter violence, but this reactionary measure only addresses part of the problem. Instead, we must identify threats, mitigate risk, and protect children and staff before an act of violence occurs.” — Jeniffer Peters, Founder of Voice4Impact

(Include contributions from Yang Gao, Tony Tonev, and Arafat Bin Hossain)

Chicago is considered the most gang-infested city in the United States, with a population of over 100,000 active members from nearly 60 factions. Gang warfare and retaliation are common in Chicago. In 2020 Chicago has seen a 43% rise in killings so far compared to 2019.

Can we use AI to reduce gang violence


Wikimedia Hackathon 2013

To create innovation and build real solutions, we need to move beyond hackathons.

Hackathons are perceived as a fast track to innovation. Creative minds come together and solve problems. This all sounds good in theory but let us look at the facts.

Currently, there are dozens of hackathons in response to COVID-19, 1000s of people are giving their time to build solutions. I even mentored one of the largest, where over 1000 engineers participated. The organizers put days, if not weeks, of work into it. So I truly commend their efforts and their goodwill. However, without taking away anything from them I question the effectiveness of hackathons.

Why hackathons won’t build real-world solutions

Reason 1: Lack of domain expertise

Social problems like COVID-19 cannot be…


Wikimedia Hackathon 2013

Here is what we should do instead to build AI solutions successfully.

There are dozens of hackathons that are being organized these days in response to COVID-19, 1000s of people are giving their time to build solutions. I have mentored one of the largest in Europe, where over 1000 engineers participated. The organizers put days, if not weeks, of work into it. So I truly commend their efforts and goodwill. However, without taking away anything from the organizers and participants, I question the effectiveness of hackathons.

Why hackathons won’t build real-world solutions

  1. Lack of domain expertise: Social problems like COVID-19 cannot be solved only by engineers. …


From a lack of food to a lack of jobs and no effective support mechanisms where it is most needed.

I am worried if killing the economies is worth it if we so laxly approach the support for the most affected populations? — Dawid, Poland

April 7th, 2020:

The economical lockdown around the world has resulted in an increase in violence, a lack of food supply, overloaded healthcare systems, and global panic response that will trigger mental health consequences long after the pandemic is over.

Experts agree that government policies need to balance overcoming both the health and economic crisis. In the short run, economic policies should mitigate the impact of lockdowns and ensure that the current crisis does not…


www.omdena.com

Why we need a global approach to solve crises like the Coronavirus.

This crisis shows both the interdependence among countries in the world as well as how countries and communities are impacted on a different scale.

A call for solidarity

After we started a global Coronavirus Policy AI Challenge on our innovation platform at Omdena with more than 70 AI and domain experts, we asked our global community of nearly 1000 collaborators to share their dreams, fears, expectations, and hopes while going through the current crisis.

We have collected 28 stories from 25 countries. This article is part 1 and covers 14 inspiring and thought-provoking stories raising important questions:

What happens to people in the informal…


Photo by Marco Oriolesi on Unsplash

Are government policies taking into account the poorest and the most vulnerable?

A migrant worker in India dies after walking 200 km on the way back to his home [1].

Rural itinerant workers in China are being blocked from cities, kicked out of apartments and rejected by companies [2].

“Poverty will kill us before the virus” — Rajneesh, a migrant worker, walking 247Km on foot to his home [3].

Chaos, confusion and a stampede-like situation prevailed at the Delhi-Ghaziabad border as hundreds of migrant workers fought amongst themselves to get seats on the limited number of buses [7].


https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e3-33f5-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

What defines a good conversation? Someone asked.

After thinking for a while, I answered, ‘A good conversation is where I learn something new, but a great conversation is where it feels effortless. Where just the presence of another person makes you feel good’.

She replied, ‘But, at times you have to put effort into a conversation because that’s how the world is’.

I keep away from conversations that require putting an effort’, I said.

I follow the above rule of effortlessness being not only in conversations but in every aspect of my life. This brings an interesting observation. …


This is a story about how data science expertise and understanding in human psychology helped me drive interesting insights to design better games.

Screenshot of a game. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bagogames/31959169544)

Background

Last week, as a mentor of Google for Startups, I had the opportunity to work with 10 Game Studios from Central and Eastern Europe. These startups have from 2–10M active users, a Monthly Recurring Revenue from 150k to 200K, and team sizes that range from 10–80 people. Although they vary in terms of revenues and user base, they all had the same challenges:

Rudradeb Mitra

Building Omdena: Bottom-Up Collaboration Platform, Professional experience: 7 startups, Mentor@Google for Startups, Speaker 100+ events in 30 countries.

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